Ask City Council to Adopt a Ravine Protection Ordinance

Join Friends of the Ravines in collecting signatures to present to Columbus City Council in support of a Ravine Protection Ordinance. You can email us at friendsoftheravines @ gmail.com to show your support, or download the PDF form and gather signatures to add to our collection.

Columbus ravines have taken a beating lately. One disappeared forever. Let’s urge city council to make ravine protection a priority.

Ravine Protection Petition

Bill Moose Ravine Unexpectedly Destroyed

Part of Bill Moose Ravine in Clintonville, at 5132 N. High Street, was destroyed to make way for a Raising Canes fast food restaurant.

FLOW learned about the situation from a community member just a few days ago (7/23/14), and by then it was too late to try to do anything to protect the ravine from being destroyed.

We are not sure if FLOW, or the community, could have done anything to protect the ravine, but we will never know. This is a significant loss of green space, wildlife habitat, and storm water protection for our community.

Below are some pictures of the site taken today, Sunday 7/27/14. The pictures do not even come close to showing the scale of destruction to the ravine. The ravine slope in the pictures below appears very small, it is actually about 40 ‘feet’ high and hundreds of feet long.

Bill Moose 1

(above pic) – Ravine slope is about 40 feet high. The tree stumps were old growth trees that were 2-3 feet in diameter.

Bill Moose 2

(Above pic) – Graceland Bob Evan’s in the background. The picture makes the ravine slope look small, the slope is actually about 40 feet high, it’s a significant loss of wildlife habitat, green space, and storm water run off protection for our community.

Bill Moose 3

(Above Pic) – Many old growth trees were destroyed. These trees provided habitat for wildlife and helped prevent storm water runoff. The scale of these pictures makes the trees look small. These trees were about 2-3 feet in diameter, and some of the trees were about 3-5 feet in diameter.

Bill Moose 4

The slope in the above picture is about 40 feet high – all trees, shrubs, plants, and habitat have been destroyed. The broken tree stump in the background was roughly a 5 feet diameter old growth tree.